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    14.02.18 — SCCER - Future Swiss Electrical Infrastructure The EPFL-Power Electronics Laboratory (WP3 contributor) started a SFOE-funded project on the establishment of a MV emulation platform for pumped hydro storage plants (PHSP).  Read the whole article
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    14.02.18 — IC in the news The Tribune de Genève publishes the views of Victor Kristof, an IC doctoral student, on building safeguards to artificial intelligence, which should assist in ensuring a serener future. Read the whole article
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    14.02.18 — STI | School of Engineering Given the growing number of users and the widening range of devices, streaming is no longer viable in its current form owing to the substantial amount of power and storage capacity it requires. But researchers at EPFL’s Embedded Systems Laboratory (ESL) have found a way to reduce those requirements without impacting the quality of the video itself.  Read the whole article
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    14.02.18 — STI | School of Engineering Of all the electricity produced in Switzerland, 56% comes from hydropower. The life span of hydroelectric plants, which are massive and expensive to build and maintain, is measured in decades, yet the rivers and streams they depend on and the surrounding environment are ever-changing. These changes affect the machinery and thus the amount of electricity that can be revised. EPFL's Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines (LMH) is working on an issue that will be very important in the coming years: the impact of sediment erosion on turbines, which are the main component of this machinery. The laboratory’s work could help prolong these plants’ ability to produce electricity for Switzerland's more than eight million residents.  Read the whole article
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    Innovation

    14.02.18 — Mediacom How much impact does research carried out at individual universities have on innovation globally? To find out, a team of scientists from several schools developed a ranking system based on citations in patent literature. And on that score, EPFL sits in seventh place, just behind Stanford and above the California Institute of Technology. Read the whole article
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    13.02.18 — Environmental Remote Sensing Laboratory Prof. Alexis Berne, Director of the Environmental Remote Sensing Laboratory, was invited this morning to a special program on RTS dedicated to mountains, snow, and the multiple associated challenges. Read the whole article
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    13.02.18 — Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory The Swiss newspaper "Neue Zürcher Zeitung" (NZZ) brought the question "Tandem or Not Tandem?" for future solar cells to the general public.  Read the whole article
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    13.02.18 — EPFL Fribourg Catherine De Wolf, postdoctoral researcher at the Structural Xploration Lab, has just co-edited the book "Embodied Carbon in Buildings | Measurement, Management, and Mitigation" (Springer, 2018), which provides a single-source reference for whole life embodied impacts of buildings. The comprehensive and persuasive text, written by over 50 invited experts from across the world, offers an indispensable resource both to newcomers and to established practitioners in the field. Ultimately it provides a persuasive argument as to why embodied impacts are an essential aspect of sustainable built environments. Read the whole article
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    Research

    13.02.18 — SB | Basic Sciences The 45-year-old Nicholas U. Mayall Telescope, is temporarily closing for the installation of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), which will allow it to build the largest 3D map of the universe, which could help to solve the mystery of how dark energy drives the accelerating expansion of the universe. EPFL is full partner of the DESI project through key contributions to its unique fiber positioner robotic system. Read the whole article
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    13.02.18 — EPFL Assembly Ronan Boulic has been elected as the new President of the School Assembly. Read the whole article